Your Heart Must Go On

Celine Dion

I am a huge Celine Dion fan! When I was 13, my older cousin’s boyfriend gave her a Celine Dion greatest hits of 1982-1996 album, and it pretty much became mine. After years of reading Mills and Boon novels, I finally had the soundtrack for romance. Everything made sense, and I was ready for love! I learned all the words to all the songs. I even made a music book. For those who don’t know what a music book is, before Google, There was no way to learn the lyrics to a song but to listen carefully stop the tape and write what you heard in your music book. There were a lot of discrepancies between what she sang and what I heard, but that didn’t matter I was hooked.

A couple of years and heartbreaks later. I saw Celine in concert, on tv she was singing “My heart will go on” after the death of her husband. Her eyes were glistening with tears as her voice effortlessly tore the roof of the building. Something had changed in me. Instead of feeling what I felt at 13 I was appalled! I asked myself¬† “Why is she letting people see her like this? Can’t she see these people will use this against her? “They do not deserve to see her like this.” I had changed. The hopelessly romantic 13-year-old was gone.

During my quest for healing, I came across Brene Brown’s Ted Talk on vulnerability, and it absolutely changed my perception. To put in a nutshell, she says people who love wholeheartedly believe they are worthy of love. They fully embrace the courage to invest in a relationship that may or may not work. So Somewhere in between 13 and 27, I lost the faith that I deserved to be loved. The problem with having your walls up is that they block everything out.¬† The good and the bad. Brene says it takes courage to be vulnerable and I now agree. For one to stand in the spotlight and let the world see their pain, that is courage. It is imperative that we understand this for ourselves and also teach our children.

Shakespear